The Smell Of Napalm In The Morning

If you can read this, that means that I’ve now upgraded Yaki to the latest revision of Snakelets (1.50, which is where development on it has halted) and it is minimally working, which entailed merging a bunch of things together and has resulted in a near-suicidal live deployment of an utterly unstable version of the site.

Which is fine and good, since I have a week’s leave to go and probably enough time to sort out any issues that may arise. This is a hobby site after all, and I have more incentive to fix things if they’re publicly broken (besides, my usual staging box is shut down for a week or so since I’m also moving stuff about in my home office).

For those of you clamoring for a merge to the Google Code project, it’s not going to happen until Summer, for the following reasons:

  1. There won’t be enough time (the full amount of changes since 2007 is enormous)
  2. There is some code that I won’t be sharing, and that isn’t isolated yet (turning Yaki into a library was only the first step), so there won’t be a code dump either.
  3. There is quite a bit of stuff I want to fix yet (and by that I don’t mean “make it perfect”, I mean “make it not crash”, including a very subtle bug that is currently causing both the indexer and the new cache to misbehave.)
  4. The current codebase needs some cleaning up (mostly removal of now deprecated stuff and Python 2.6/3.0 stuff), and I’m quite a bit concerned about BeautifulSoup and might move to html5lib instead, but that implies changing the way I deal with HTML profoundly and is going to be a pain.
  5. Also, I’ve been waiting for pytextile to improve a bit (there is at least one issue that prevents me from using it instead of the ancient implementation I’m still running, but that’s only an example – last time I tried it a lot of my table formatting was broken…).

Finally, I want to build a new theme for the public release (yes, an even simpler one), and by that I mean following in my former tradition and stealing Michael’s K2 to give the public release a popular, “regular site” look (never under-estimate the importance of marketing).

For regular readers, the site may behave strangely or be down for a while over the coming days. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.